Books on Combinatorics
Ramanujan: Twelve Lectures on Subjects Suggested by His Life and Work
Godfrey Harold Hardy
American Mathematical Society  November 25, 1999

Ramanujan occupies a unique place in analytic number theory. His formulas, identities, and calculations are still amazing three-quarters of a century after his death. Many of his discoveries seem to have appeared as if from the ether. His mentor and primary collaborator was the famous G. H. Hardy. Here, Hardy collects twelve of his own lectures on topics stemming from Ramanujan's life and work. The topics include partitions, hypergeometric series, Ramanujan's $\tau$-function and round numbers. Hardy was the first to recognize the brilliance of Ramanujan's ideas. As one of the great mathematicians of the time, it is fascinating to read Hardy's accounts of their importance and influence. The book concludes with a chapter by chapter overview written by Bruce C. Berndt. In this overview, Berndt gives references to current literature, developments since Hardy's original lectures, and background information on Ramanujan's research, including his unpublished papers.

Ramanujan's Lost Notebook, Part I
George E. Andrews and Bruce Berndt
Springer  May 6, 2005

In the spring of 1976, George Andrews of Pennsylvania State University visited the library at Trinity College, Cambridge, to examine the papers of the late G.N. Watson. Among these papers, Andrews discovered a sheaf of 138 pages in the handwriting of Srinivasa Ramanujan. This manuscript was soon designated, "Ramanujan's lost notebook." Its discovery has frequently been deemed the mathematical equivalent of finding Beethoven's tenth symphony.

Ramanujan's Notebooks, Part II
Bruce C. Berndt
Springer  January 18, 1999

During the years 1903-1914, Ramanujan recorded many of his mathematical discoveries in notebooks without providing proofs. Although many of his results were already in the literature, more were not. Almost a decade after Ramanujan's death in 1920, G.N. Watson and B.M. Wilson began to edit his notebooks but never completed the task. A photostat edition, with no editing, was published by the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research in Bombay in 1957. This book is the second of four volumes devoted to the editing of Ramanujan's Notebooks. Part I, published in 1985, contains an account of Chapters 1-9 in the second notebook as well as a description of Ramanujan's quarterly reports. In this volume, we examine Chapters 10-15 in Ramanujan's second notebook. If a result is known, we provide references in the literature where proofs may be found; if a result is not known, we attempt to prove it. Not only are the results fascinating, but, for the most part, Ramanujan's methods remain a mystery. Much work still needs to be done. We hope readers will strive to discover Ramanujan's thoughts and further develop his beautiful ideas.

Ramanujan's Notebooks, Part III
Bruce C. Berndt
Springer  November 11, 2004

Upon Ramanujans death in 1920, G. H. Hardy strongly urged that Ramanujans notebooks be published and edited. In 1957, the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research in Bombay finally published a photostat edition of the notebooks, but no editing was undertaken. In 1977, Berndt began the task of editing Ramanujans notebooks: proofs are provided to theorems not yet proven in previous literature, and many results are so startling as to be unique.

Ramanujan's Notebooks, Part V
Bruce C. Berndt
Springer  May 26, 2005

This book constitutes the fifth and final volume to establish the results claimed by the great Indian mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan in his "Notebooks" first published in 1957. Although each of the five volumes contains many deep results, perhaps the average depth in this volume is greater than in the first four. There are several results on continued fractions a subject that Ramanujan loved very much. It is the author's wish that this volume and previous volumes will serve as springboards for further investigations by mathematicians intrigued by Ramanujan's remarkable ideas.

Random Matrix Models and Their Applications
Pavel Bleher, Alexander Its
Cambridge University Press  September 23, 2010

Random matrices arise from and have applications to numerous problems of physics and mathematics. This volume of surveys and research results, based largely on lectures given at the Spring 1999 MSRI program of the same name, covers broad areas such as topologic andcombinatorial aspects of random matrix theory; scaling limits, universalities and phase transitions in matrix models; universalities for random polynomials; and applications to integrable systems. Its stress on the interaction between physics and mathematics will make it a welcome addition to the shelves of graduate students and researchers in both fields, as will its expository emphasis.

Recent Advances in Algorithmic Combinatorics
Reed, Bruce A. and Linhares_Sales, Claudial
Springer Verlag  Jan 1, 2003

Reflection Groups and Coxeter Groups
James E. Humphreys
Cambridge University Press  October 19, 1992

In this graduate textbook Professor Humphreys presents a concrete and up-to-date introduction to the theory of Coxeter groups. He assumes that the reader has a good knowledge of algebra, but otherwise the book is self contained. The first part is devoted to establishing concrete examples; the author begins by developing the most important facts about finite reflection groups and related geometry, and showing that such groups have a Coxeter representation. In the next chapter these groups are classified by Coxeter diagrams, and actual realizations of these groups are discussed. Chapter 3 discusses the polynomial invariants of finite reflection groups, and the first part ends with a description of the affine Weyl groups and the way they arise in Lie theory. The second part (which is logically independent of, but motivated by, the first) starts by developing the properties of the Coxeter groups. Chapter 6 shows how earlier examples and others fit into the general classification of Coxeter diagrams. Chapter 7 is based on the very important work of Kazhdan and Lusztig and the last chapter presents a number of miscellaneous topics of a combinatorial nature.

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